DECOLONIZE NOW

Mary | recent college grad | twenty-something |Black, fat, neuroatypical, Ugandan American, allistic, dyadic, able bodied, questioning, cis woman | social justice and stuff

Home /Ask/Photos of Me/Personal/ Archive

2 of 792

i-always-slytherwin:

Saw this outside a store near my house, please spread! This is in the Spring Valley area of San Diego, but please spread it in case any of your followers are from around here!

fatleopard:

DVRK PARTY PT1 

"i always hated that there were no models that looked like me , then it hit me . I look like me " - Snap 

DVRK PARTY IS A CREATIVE COLLABORATION BETWEEN @kidnapsnap  AND fatleopard 

Styled by @kidnapsnap  

Creative Direction - @kidnapsnap   and fatleopard

Graphic design and photography by fatleopard

Makeup by Chiamaka Ekweghariri

MORE ON FOREVERFATLEOPARD.COM

I work with my acting coach to help me get into character and do pronunciation drills and tongue twisters to help me deliver lines.

I envision the script as a story in my mind, memorize the entire thing and have it play out. It helps me figure out where my character needs to go.

You have to be serious, but you also have to make your own time to have fun.

I tell jokes, I laugh with the people on set, I play with the director. Then I try to pay attention and see what I have to do.

When I need to cry, I think of very sad things, mostly about animals. My favorite animal is a polar bear. They’re going extinct, and I really don’t want that to happen.

Quvenzhané Wallis

Quotes are from Quvenzhané Wallis’s Secrets: Work Hard, Play Hard, Think About Polar Bears in The New York Times by Molly Young. She got to talk to Quvenzhané about her creative process. This child is so gifted.

(I’m still low key mad that her epic commercial wasn’t a film but instead a commercial for Maserati. I’m gonna go see Annie during Christmas time, in the meanwhile.)

2 hours ago with 542 notes

2am-poetry:

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Joana Choumali

Hââbre, the last generation

1. Ms. Djeneba : ” I used to like my scars; they were beautiful. We used to brag about them. But, now, in the city, it is definitely out of fashion.”

2. Mrs. Sinou : “I refuse to do it to my children. This will stay on my face only.”

3.Mr. Konabé : “Our parents did this not to get lost in life. When you went somewhere, you could not get lost.”

4. Mr. Lawal : “It is here in town that I am ‘nobody’. In the village, I am a noble; people bow down when they see my face! I am proud of that.”

5. Mr. Salbre : “ I do not want this for my children. We are the last generation “

6. Ms. Martine : “When I was 10 years, I asked for them. I wanted to be like my brothers and sisters, and to show that I am courageous. “ 

7. Mr. Guemi : “I already wear my identity card on my face. This is the reason why people did it : to recognize one another. But now, this is over. We can no more be recognized.”

Website

why does this hurt my heart?

It breaks my heart when traditions are phased out due to embarrassment because it feels like western influence is ultimately to blame.

geminiio:

i need ferguson to go down in history books. i need school children in the year 2074 to learn about michael brown being shot on august 9th, 2014 by officer darren wilson. i need this to spark a movement. this can not lose the focus of society a mere month after it happened. 

13 hours ago with 49,010 notes

933
ilfred:

about this schmoney, let’s get it poppin

ilfred:

about this schmoney, let’s get it poppin

Im serious when I say that white people better give credit where credit is due when it comes to discussing racism.

Especially if it’s your friends of color who are calling you out on shit. The mental toil that we go through to call you out is exhausting. So don’t you dare go passing off info as if you’ve come to some brilliant realization on your own. I swear if I see a white person do this with info I’ve given them, I will scream.

15 hours ago with 7 notes

862

After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

After years of stock characters, [Viola] was thrilled to play a real protagonist, a fully developed, conflicted, somewhat mysterious woman. “It’s what I’ve had my eye on for so long,” she said. “It’s time for people to see us, people of color, for what we really are: complicated.” | x |

Tagged: #viola davis